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Kollar, Holt and Ware join HOF

HALL OF FAME

Fri, Apr 11, 2014

MOBILE, ALA. – The Reese’s Senior Bowl welcomed three new members into its Hall of Fame on April 10 with the addition of Denver Broncos defensive end DeMarcus Ware, former St. Louis Rams wide receiver Torry Holt and Houston Texans defensive line coach Bill Kollar, who played for the Cincinnati Bengals in the 70s.

'We could not have asked for three better inductees in 2014.'

-- Phil Savage

The trio makes up the 26th class in the Senior Bowl Hall of Fame, presented by Mobile Gas, and pushes the total number of inductees to 105 – an exclusive club when you consider that nearly 5,000 players have donned a Senior Bowl uniform. The three former Senior Bowlers were inducted at the Grand Hotel Marriott Resort in Point Clear, Ala., and joined a prestigious group that includes the likes of Joe Namath, Walter Payton, Dan Marino, Bo Jackson and Brett Favre.

“We are so proud of this year’s Senior Bowl Hall of Fame class,” said Reese’s Senior Bowl Executive Director Phil Savage. “Altogether, we could not have asked for three better inductees in 2014 .”

Here is a closer look at the Senior Bowl Hall of Fame, Class of 2014:

 DEMARCUS WARE | 2005 SENIOR BOWL 

During his nine seasons with the Dallas Cowboys, the former Troy University standout was one of the most feared pass rushers in the NFL, and still is today as he gets ready to start a new phase of his career with the defending AFC Champion Denver Broncos.

Ware, the 11th overall pick in the 2005 NFL Draft,  is the second fastest player in league history to reach 100 sacks and is one of only three players to record 10-plus sacks in seven consecutive seasons. The Auburn, Ala., native and seven-time Pro Bowler has ranked in the top three in the NFL in total sacks in four of the past five seasons and holds the Cowboys’ franchise records in career sacks (117), fumbles forced (32) and multi-sack games (28).

“He is one of the preeminent pass rushers of his generation,” Savage said. “We are excited to see him continue his illustrious career with the Denver Broncos.”

 TORRY HOLT | 1999 SENIOR BOWL 

Holt was one of the key figures in the ‘Greatest Show on Turf’ that fueled the St. Louis Rams’ Super Bowl XXXIV Championship.  He broke Super Bowl rookie records for receptions (7) and yards (109) in the Rams 23-16 win over the Titans in 2000.

During his 11 seasons in the NFL (10 with the Rams and one with the Jaguars), the North Carolina State standout had 920 receptions, 13,382 yards and 74 touchdowns. His 868 receptions and 12,594 receiving yards from 2000-2009 led the league and still stands as the most catches and yards in a decade in NFL history.

"I want to say thanks to the Senior Bowl for this tremendous honor," Holt said.

The seven-time Pro Bowl selection was a member of the 2000s NFL All-Decade Team, and holds the NFL record for consecutive seasons with at least 90 receptions (6) and at least 1,300 yards (6).

“Torry was described as an A+ player and person at NC State,” said Savage, “and went on to a fabulous career with the St. Louis Rams that included Pro Bowls and Super Bowls.”

BILL KOLLAR | 1974 SENIOR BOWL 

The MVP of the 1974 game was a first-round draft pick of the Cincinnati Bengals. Kollar played eight seasons for the Bengals and Tampa Bay Buccaneers before starting a coaching career that has now spanned three decades.

The Montana State graduate is in his sixth year with the Houston Texans, currently serving as the assistant head coach/defensive line coach. He has coached the defensive line in 24 of his 25 seasons on an NFL sideline.

During his first two seasons with the Texans, Kollar directed the defensive line to the two best run stopping seasons in club history, and the defensive unit also registered at least 30 sacks in three consecutive seasons – another franchise record.

“Bill was the MVP of the 1974 game and has now become the MVP of defensive line coaches in the NFL over the past 25 years,” Savage said.

Kollar also coached the defensive line with the Falcons, Rams and Bills.